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Declarative sentences
How does the English language have mathematical answers?
What is a declarative sentence?
What are the types of declarative sentences?
What are the types of simple declarative sentences?
How many types of declarative sentences are there?
What are various examples?
How many types of simple declarative sentence are there?
How do you write a simple declarative sentence?
What are various patterns of simple declarative sentence?
What are the parts of a declarative sentence?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
What are the different verb tenses?
What should be goals of your English language learning?
If you ask me this question, how do you write an English language sentence?
The answer to this question depends on the answer to these questions:
What is on your mind?
What thought would you like to put in a sentence?
Do you want to declare or describe something like, size, shape, condition, or function?
Do you want to ask a question?
Do you want to give a command?
Do you want to express emotion?
Does it need a declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentence?
If you want to declare or describe something like, size, shape, condition, or function, it needs a declarative sentence.
If you want to ask a question, it needs an interrogative sentence.
If you want to give a command, it needs an imperative sentence.
If you want to express emotions, it needs an exclamatory sentence.

English Grammar Rules of Writing Sentences

How did English grammar rules come into existence?
What are English grammar rules?


Classification of Sentences

Do you know the classification of sentences?

How do you classify English language sentences?

How should you classify English language sentences?
What is a statement sentence?

How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?

What kind of sentence is it?

Is a declarative sentence an imperative sentence as well?
How does a declarative sentence end?
What is an interrogative sentence?
What kind of sentence is a question?
What is a question?
How does one write a question?
What constitutes a declarative sentence?
How does one write a declarative sentence?
What are the different verb tenses?
What is a complete sentence?
How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our? The second person you and your? The third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
How do you change a declarative sentence to an interrogative sentence?
How do you change an interrogative sentence to a declarative sentence?
What is most common pattern of a declarative sentence?
What should you know to be able to write declarative sentences?
What verb should you use with singular nouns?
What verb should you use with a plural noun?
Are there any exceptions?
What are the exceptions?
What is subject and verb agreement?
What are the guidelines for subject and verb agreement?
Where do you use the word is?
Where do you use the word are?
What are the words similar to this word?
How do you write a declarative sentence?
What is a subject?
What is a predicate?
What should be the verb tense of the declarative sentence?
Should it be written in past, present, or future tense?
Do you need to write a simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex declarative sentence?
Do you know the classification of sentences?
English language sentence classification by purpose.
English language sentence classification depending on the number and type of clauses.
What is English language sentence classification by purpose?
What is English language sentence classification depending on the number and type of clauses?
Some also call this classification as sentences by structures or variety.
Do you know what verb tenses are?
Do you know what simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex declarative sentence are?
Do you know how every part of English speech or sentence is classified?
There are many different classifications of verbs.
You need to follow the classification that solves real-world problems.
You need to follow those details so that you can write declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences.
What should your response be while analyzing a declarative sentence?
What are various patterns of simple declarative sentence?
How does the English language have mathematical answers?
Simple declarative sentence
SUBJECT AND PREDICATE
SUBJECT AND PREDICATE
Remember how to find the subject of a sentence.
The subject of a sentence is the person, place, or thing you are writing about. You may use the personal pronouns I, he, she, we, and they as the subject or part of the subject.
1. A basic sentence
2. A subject of a clause
3. A simple subject
4. The subject usually precedes
5. A predicate
6. A simple predicate
7. A direct object
8. An indirect object
9. In sentences where
10. When a pronoun is used
11.
12. When both the direct object
13. A typical word order
14. To expand the basic one-clause-
15. A complement
16. A modifier
17. An appositive
Basic Sentence Structures in English
Adding Prepositional Phrases to the Basic Sentence Unit
Arranging Prepositional Phrases
Position of the Subject
In a declarative sentence, the Subject is usually the first constituent:
However, there are exceptions to this.
Subject Predicate
Seek and Ye Shall Find
1.To find the subject, ask yourself, “Self, what word is the sentence describing?”
2.To find an action verb, ask yourself, “Self, what did the subject do?”
3.If you can't find an action verb, look for a linking verb.
Adding Adjectives and Adverbs to the Basic Sentence Unit
Sentence Function Quiz
Incomplete Sentences: Fragments
Complex Sentence:
Complex Sentence
Some terms to know when dealing with Declarative Sentences


How does the English language have mathematical answers?
Here are further guidelines.

What is a declarative sentence?

A declarative sentence is used to make a statement.
An interrogative sentence is used to pose a question.
An imperative sentence is used to give a command or to implore or entreat.
An exclamatory sentence is used to express astonishment or extreme emotion.

Declarative sentences can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex sentences.

Most of the letters start with a declarative sentence.
I am writing to you after I got no response from your office.
I am writing to you after I faced harms from people educated by you or your curriculum. This has become essential you answer these questions publicly.
I am writing to you after I discovered substandard curriculum being used by you to educate students.
I am writing to you after I discovered obsolete curriculum being used by you to educate students by you.

You can add interrogative sentence or a question as well.
Add few imperative and exclamatory statements as well.
What should be the last sentence of the letter?
Usually again a declarative sentence.
I look forward for a solution as soon as possible.

Declarative sentences may be short and simple, getting straight to the point, or declarative sentences may be lengthier and include prepositions, objects of prepositions, direct objects, and indirect objects. In a declarative sentence, the subject normally precedes the verb. A declarative sentence ends with a period.

A starting word of a declarative sentence will determine other words that need to be used.
A complete thought will determine other words that need to be used.
Would you like to begin a sentence with a pronoun, noun, preposition, adverb, adjective, verb, conjunction, or interjection?
What are examples of a pronoun, noun, preposition, adverb, adjective, verb, conjunction, or interjection?
Is it singular or plural?
Is it a pronoun, noun, preposition, adverb, adjective, verb, conjunction, or interjection?
Once you have decided the first word of a declarative sentence, you need to add a verb, preposition, object, and other parts of speech if required.
What should be the verb tense of the sentence?
Do you want the verb tense to be simple present tense, present continuous tense, present perfect tense, present perfect continuous tense, simple past tense, past continuous tense, past perfect tense, past perfect continuous tense, simple future tense, future continuous tense, future perfect tense, or future perfect continuous tense?

Word order and pattern of declarative and interrogative sentences are different.
You should not apply concepts of declarative sentences to interrogative sentences.

Declarative sentences are the most common type of sentences in the English language. Entire essays or reports often are written using only declarative sentences, and one should use them far more often than any other type. A declarative sentence simply states a fact or argument, without requiring either an answer or action from the reader. Declarative sentences are punctuated with a simple period.

You answer a question with a declarative sentence.
Imperative and exclamatory sentences are less common.
The grass is green.
I like tea.
These are declarative sentences.

What are the parts of a declarative sentence?

The subject and predicate concept is applicable to declarative sentences.
There are various combinations.

How many types of declarative sentences are there?
4.

What are various examples?
1. Simple declarative sentence.
2. Compound declarative sentence.
3. Complex declarative sentence.
4. Complex compound declarative sentence.

What are the types of declarative sentences?

Simple declarative sentence.
Compound declarative sentence.
Complex declarative sentence.
Complex compound declarative sentence.

How many types of simple declarative sentence are there?
9.

What are the types of simple declarative sentences?
What are various patterns of simple declarative sentence?

There are more than nine types of simple declarative sentences.
They are also called patterns of simple declarative sentences.

A simple declarative sentence has following patterns.
S + V: I / smiled

What are various examples?
Here are further guidelines.
S + V + O: He / opened / the door
S + V + C: The dinner / is / ready
S + V + A: She / went / to Illinois
S + V + O + O: Asif / gave / ______ / a kiss
S + V + O + C: He / got / his feet / very wet
S + V + O + A: He / put / the bottles / in the cellar
S + V + preposition + noun: Asif is looking for you.
S + V + preposition + verb(ing)Gerund: I will email you after arriving at the homeoffice.

Subject-Verb-Complement
Subject-Verb-Direct Object
Subject-Verb-Indirect Object-Direct Object
Subject-Verb-Direct Object-Complement
Periodic Sentences
Cumulative (Loose) Sentences

How do you write a simple declarative sentence?
I, you, he, she, we, they, Asif (your name), my, their, all, a, an, the usually begins the simple declarative sentence.

You can utilize other words also.
What pattern or type of simple declarative sentence do you plan to write?
1. S + V
2. S + V + O
3. S + V + C
4. S + V + A
5. S + V + O + O
6. S + V + O + C
7. S + V + O + A
8. S + V + preposition + noun
9. S + V + preposition + verb(ing) gerund.

What should be the pattern and tense of a simple declarative sentence?

How many tenses can one pattern of simple declarative sentence have?
Each pattern of a simple declarative sentence has 12 tenses.

Here are simple declarative sentences with words beginning with I, you, he, she, we, they, Asif (your name), my, their, all, a, an, the.

I am writing to you to get answers to my questions.
You did not precisely reply to my questions.
He had no answers to my questions.
She does not have any English language abilities.
We must go ahead question by question.
They are not enhancing the economy.
Asif (your name) has many abilities and skills.
My computer needs to be replaced.
Their English language abilities are not good.
Not all English language editors are of good quality.
A, an, and the should be discarded from the English language.


I have few questions.

How many patterns of simple declarative sentences are there?

What patterns of simple declarative sentences do you know?


Do you know any other patterns of simple declaratives sentences that are not listed?

Subject

Modal
auxiliary verb

Primary
auxiliary verb(s)

Main verb

Object

I

-

-

play

the piano.

He

-

is

talking

rubbish.

Sarah

can

-

sing

opera.

I

-

have been

painting

the house.

You

should

have been

watching

the baby.


Subject + Verb
I swim. Joe swims. They swam.
Subject + Verb + Object
I ____ a car. Joe plays the guitar. They ate dinner.
Subject + Verb + Complement
I am busy. Joe became a doctor. They look sick.
Subject + Verb + Indirect Object + Direct Object
I gave her a gift. She teaches us English.
Subject + Verb + Object + Complement
I left the door open. We _________ him president. They named her Jane.
Subject + verb + preposition + "noun"
+ preposition + verb(ing)Gerund Gerunds after Prepositions
Sentences: Simple, Compound, and Complex
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Sentence Patterns
Compound Sentence Complex Sentence Compound-Complex Sentence
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
A declarative statement is one that describes some aspect of something: size, shape, condition, function. The sky is blue.

A declarative sentence can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex.

A declarative sentence states something. A declarative sentence does not command, question, or proclaim. A declarative sentence states a fact. What should be goals of your English language learning?
You should be able to write interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in the English language.
Can you write interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in English language?
What are examples of interrogative English language sentences?
What are examples of simple declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of compound declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of complex declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of compound complex English language sentences?

You should first know about a simple declarative sentence.

How do you write a simple declarative sentence?
How do you write a compound declarative sentence?
How do you write a complex declarative sentence?
How do you write a compound-complex declarative sentence?
How do you write a simple, compound, complex, compound-complex declarative sentence in various verb tenses?
What are the patterns of declarative sentences?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a noun without an adjective in different English language verb tenses?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a noun with an adjective in different English language verb tenses?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a preposition in different English language verb tenses?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a conjunction in different English language verb tenses?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with an adverb in different English language verb tenses?
Can you write a declarative sentence starting with an interjection?
Can you write a declarative sentence starting with a verb?
How do you differentiate declarative and imperative sentence?

How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a pronoun?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a pronoun in different English language verb tenses? How many verb tenses of declarative sentences are there?
What should you be able to identify in a declarative sentence?
Word order of every type of sentence is different.
How do you identify parts of a declarative sentence?
Who is the subject?
Which is the verb?
What constitutes a declarative sentence?
How does one write a declarative sentence?
What is a statement sentence?
What is a complete sentence?
How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
What is a sentence?
What is a clause?

http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/sentences.html

If you ask me this question, how do you write an English language sentence?
The answer to this question depends on the answer to these questions:
What is on your mind?

What thought would you like to put in a sentence?

Do you want to declare or describe something like, size, shape, condition, or function?
Do you want to ask a question?

Do you want to give a command?

Do you want to express emotion?

Does it need a declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamatory sentence?
If you want to declare or describe something like, size, shape, condition, or function, it needs a declarative sentence.
If you want to ask a question, it needs an interrogative sentence.
If you want to give a command, it needs an imperative sentence.
If you want to express emotions, it needs an exclamatory sentence.



English Grammar Rules of Writing Sentences

How did English grammar rules come into existence?
What are English grammar rules?

How did English grammar rules come into existence?

English grammar rules have evolved and are still evolving.
English grammar rules were not enacted by any executive order, royal decree, or global legislative enactment as of December 27, 2010. English language manuscripts circulate globally and via the Internet. You need to keep up to date with recent advances in the English language. What are English grammar rules?
English grammar rules are different for interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences.
English grammar rules are different for simple, compound, complex, and compound complex sentences.
There are few English grammar rules similar to declarative and interrogative sentences.

Classification of Sentences

Do you know the classification of sentences?

How do you classify English language sentences?

How should you classify English language sentences?


http://www.qureshiuniversity.com/sentences.html

What is a statement sentence?
A declarative sentence

How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
A declarative sentence needs no special punctuation, nothing more than a period at the end of it.

What is most common pattern of a declarative sentence?
Subject, verb, and words that complete the thought of the sentence. Words that complete the thought of the sentence can be direct object, subject complement, or other patterns.

What should you know to be able to write declarative sentences?
1. Verb, Noun, Pronoun, Adjective, Adverb, Preposition, Conjunction, Interjection
2. Verb conjugation, Verb form
3. Verb function
4. Subject and verb agreement

What verb should you use with singular nouns?

Singular nouns and pronouns go with singular verbs.

What verb should you use with a plural noun?

Plural nouns and pronouns go with plural verbs.
What is the specific combination of noun and verb called in English grammar?
Subject verb agreement.
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a noun without an adjective?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a noun with an adjective?
How do you write a declarative sentence in newspaper format?
Do you know the answer to this question?
Do you know the answers to these questions?
If you do not research or try yourself, this won't be an effective exercise.
If you do not know the answer or are confused, you need to try your best. I will tell you the correct answers after your reply.

How do you change a declarative sentence to an interrogative sentence?
Make it a question. Invert subject and verb:

How do you change an interrogative sentence to a declarative sentence?
Remove the question mark and change the word order so that it becomes a statement. Subject and verb change their position in statement and question.

You write a news story in a declarative sentence.
You can add interrogative sentences as well.
You even can write an interrogative sentence with a declarative answer.
How many sentences can you write with these words?
For example:
A, an, the, it, it's, you, he, his, they, they've, that, their, we, people, all, also, another, after, any, but, most, never, in fact, if, although, some of, while, for the first time, from, of course, prepositions. Number, for example, Six people, one man.
Now answer this question:

What is a subject?

Subjects usually are nouns, noun phrases, or pronouns. Predicates are the parts of the sentence that includes verbs, direct and indirect objects, object complements, and subject complements.

subject + predicate

Declarative sentences consist of a subject and a predicate. The subject may be a simple subject or a compound subject.

Sentences are regarded as declarative when the subject comes before the verb. A declarative statement is one that describes some aspect of something: size, shape, condition, function. The sky is blue.
A declarative sentence can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex.

Subjects usually are nouns, noun phrases, or pronouns. Predicates are the parts of the sentence that includes verbs, direct and indirect objects, object complements, and subject complements.

Noun phrase

subject + predicate

Declarative sentences consist of a subject and a predicate. The subject may be a simple subject or a compound subject.

For example:
His name is Jhon.
In this sentence, the subject is "his name" and the predicate is "is Jhon".

Examples:

* Mario plays the piano.
* I hope you can come tomorrow.
* We've forgotten the sugar.

Subject
The subject of a complete sentence is who or what the sentence is about.
The subject performs the action, if there is any, in a sentence.
The subject is always a noun or a pronoun.
Traditionally, although not always, the subject is the noun or pronoun closest to the beginning of the sentence.

Writing and using complete sentences is important to earn good grades, express ideas properly, and communicate clearly.

Declarative sentences always have a subject and a predicate. The subject can be simple with a noun phrase or it can be a compound subject. Compound subjects are made of more than one simple subject combined with a conjunction such as and, or, and but.

What is a predicate?
Predicate
The predicate is the action or what is going on in the sentence.

It is always a verb.
A predicate can be one word or several words, not all of which are verbs.
It is always the main action of a sentence.
Linking verbs are not the sort of verb that makes up the predicate.
List of linking verbs,
Sentence fragments and incomplete sentences can lack a predicate:
I gave him.
She received the entire.

Are these sentences?

1. "Ashley walks to the park."
2. "She takes a friend with her."
3. "Climb a tree."

Both (1) and (2) are sentences, but (3) is not a sentence. Why? It does not express a complete thought. We wonder: who climbs a tree? Why?

-By adding some words to (3) we can make a complete sentence:

"Ashley and her friend climb a tree."

Every sentence has a subject and a predicate. The subject usually contains the main subject or noun, and the predicate tells what the subject is doing, which contains the verb of the sentence.

Subject Predicate
Ashley walks to the park
She takes a friend with her
Ashley and her friend climb a tree

A complete sentence is not complete without end of sentence punctuation, which can be one of the following:
period, question mark,
exclamation point.

Does every sentence end with a period?
No, because sentences can also end with ! or ?

How does one write a declarative sentence?
Writing simple declarative sentences is a matter of following a simple formula:
Subject + Predicate

Declarative sentences always have a subject and a predicate. The subject can be simple with a noun phrase or it can be a compound subject. Compound subjects are made of more than one simple subject combined with a conjunction such as and, or, and but.

Here is an example for you.

My coat is red.

Simple Subject - "My coat"

Predicate - "is red"

Katie and I rode our bikes to school.

The word Katie and the word I are two simple subjects joined by the conjunction and to make a compound subject.

A Few More Examples of Declarative Sentences

I have an appointment at 2:00 today.
Tomorrow I leave for France.
I told him dinner will be served promptly at six.
It’s a nice day for a walk along the beach.
I think you should wear the blue shirt with the khaki pants.
We’re going to the movies later this evening.
After the snow storm, the air smelled fresh and clean.
Compound Declarative Sentences

A compound declarative sentence helps vary sentence length within your writing, thereby making it more interesting to read. You can write a compound sentence in a variety of ways. Here are a few formulas to keep in mind.

1. A comma and conjunction joins the sentences.

The band played for hours, and the audience went wild.

John had to catch the next flight to Boston, so he packed as quickly as he could.

2. A semicolon joins the two sentences.

The band played for hours; the audience went wild.

John had to catch the next flight to Boston; he packed as quickly as he could.

3. A semicolon plus a transition word.

Transition words are actually conjunctions that are adverbs. Not sure about transition words? No problem. Examples of transition words are below:

¦However
¦In fact
¦Nonetheless
¦Besides
¦Instead
¦Moreover
¦Therefore
¦On the other hand
¦Nevertheless
And many more…

The house had a new roof and exterior paint; however the pipes were old.

Mary’s essay was phenomenal; in fact, it won the Young Author’s contest.

Jim worked hard everyday; therefore, he expected a raise at the end of the year.

As long as people want or need information, declarative sentences will be there to serve the purpose. When you think about it, it would extremely difficult to write anything at all without some type of declarative sentence.

Remember declarative sentences come in all forms: simple, compound and complex. They can make a point quickly or they can include direct objects, prepositions, indirect objects, and objects of prepositions. Whatever the structure, the purpose remains the same – to deliver a statement or fact.

The point is don’t let the sentence length confuse you. As long as it states something and doesn’t ask a question, make a command or an exclamation, it’s a declarative sentence.

You enhance your writing when you use a variety of sentence lengths and structures, which should always be your goal. Writing and reading, especially, should never be a boring task! (That’s an exclamatory sentence.)

A preposition is followed by a "noun". It is never followed by a verb.
Why is the word "to" followed by a verb in these sentences: I would like to go now; she used to smoke, as a preposition is followed by a "noun" but never by a verb?

In these sentences, "to" is not a preposition. It is part of the infinitive: to go, to smoke.

What are the different verb tenses?
Verb tenses are mainly applicable to declarative and interrogative sentences. How do you identify errors in a declarative sentence?

How do you answer a question?
Do you need to give a spoken or written answer?
Spoken answers you limit to few sentences.
How do you write an answer?
It depends on the type of question.
Multiple choice question,
Yes no, Question word question,
For question word question you write answer in a declarative sentence.

What should be first word of a declarative sentence?
What should be last word of a declarative sentence?
How should you end a declarative sentence?
What should be last sentence of an answer?
What is the best way to conclude an answer?

We had a meeting.
I raised few questions.
What type of sentence is it?
It is a declarative sentences.

How do you identify if it is a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
Are there specific words associated with a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
Are there specific characteristics of a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?

Does it state a fact or describe something and end with a period?
Does it start with a subject?
It is a declarative sentence.
Declarative sentences can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex.

Does it give a command or request something and end with a period?
It is an imperative sentence.

Does it ask a question?
Does it end in a question mark?
Does it start with a question word or a helping verb?
It is an interrogative sentence.

Discussion

What are we discussing today?
We are going to have a discussion on the topic of "English Grammar."
Are you ready?
I will give a brief presentation.
If you have any questions, please wait until the end of the presentation.
Let all get a chance to ask questions.

How are you?
What is it?
It is an interrogative sentence.

I am fine, thank you.
What is it?
It is a declarative sentence.

Wonderful news; you may get accepted to Qureshi University.
What is it?
It is an exclamatory sentence.

Always speak the truth.
What is it?
It is an imperative sentence.

You have a right to ask questions.
Is it a question?
No.
What is it?
It doesn't have the proper sequence of words of a question.
It is a declarative sentence.
Have you a right to ask questions?
Yes.
It is an interrogative sentence.
It is a question.

How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
A declarative sentence needs no special punctuation, nothing more than a period at the end of it.

What kind of sentence is it?
The building will be built on a hill.
It is a declarative sentence.

Is a declarative sentence an imperative sentence as well?
No. Mark is watching Janet play football. That's declarative. Janet, wash your hands before dinner. That's an imperative sentence.

How does a declarative sentence end?
It ends with a period.

What is an interrogative sentence?
An interrogative sentence is a sentence that asks a question.
For example: What color is the door?

What kind of sentence is a question?
An interrogative sentence. An interrogative sentence asks a question.

"Americans write and speak substandard English language," said Asif Qureshi founder, Qureshi University.

On Monday, November 16, 2009, one of the Chicago English newspaper wrote:
Operation 'Oust Stroger'?

"Is that correct? What is a question? How does one write a question"? Qureshi asked.

An interrogative sentence is one that asks a question, and is generally introduced by an interrogative pronoun: who, which, or what; or, by an auxiliary: do, am, have, shall, may, etc.
What are the rules for using which in an interrogative sentence?

Formation:
subject + predicate
Declarative sentences consist of a subject and a predicate. The subject may be a simple subject or a compound subject.

Examples of declarative sentences:

His name is Jhon.
In this sentence, the subject is "his name" and the predicate is "is Jhon".
Mario plays the piano.
I hope you can come tomorrow.
We've forgotten the sugar.
Ottawa is the capital of Canada.
It's lunch time.
The bus arrived late.
My pink sweater needs to be washed.
The book, while thought-provoking, was challenging to read because of its advanced vocabulary.

While these four types of sentences have similarities, they are more easily identified by their differences. Each type of sentence serves a different purpose.The declarative sentence is the most important type.

Most of the sentences we speak or write are declarative sentences.

As the examples above show, declarative sentences can be simple, compound or complex sentences. Sentence structure does not effect the basic purpose of the sentence. Although it should be noted that using a variety of sentence structures increases reader engagement and decreases reader boredom.

Declarative sentences are the most common type of sentence in English literature. A declarative sentence states a fact. (Interestingly, the preceding sentence, and this sentence also, are declarative sentences.)

In addition to making a statement or sharing a fact, declaratives always end with a period.

Declarative sentences may be short and simple, getting straight to the point, or declarative sentences may be lengthier and include prepositions, objects of prepositions, direct objects, and indirect objects.

Don't let a sentence's structure or length fool you! A declarative sentence states something. A declarative sentence does not command, question, or proclaim. A declarative sentence states a fact.

If you want to be a newspaper or magazine editor, and similar work in addition to other sentences, you have to be good at declarative sentences.
If you want to be a lawyer, medical doctor, and similar work, in addition to other sentences you have to be good at interrogative sentences.
If you want to have successful romance with your spouse, in addition to other sentences you have to be good at exclamatory sentences.
If you want to manage family nicely in addition to other sentences you have to be good at imperative sentences.
If you want to be a grammarian you have to know all of them thoroughly.

If you want to be a successful farmer, minimum you have to at least understand what is presented to you in the English language and reproduce what is presented to you.
How do other farmers understand not knowing English?
Research in English gets translated to their local language.
Its better they understand English language directly.

Possibly the most common sentence type in the English language, declarative sentences are used when you want to make a statement. Whether it’s a bold statement or a simple fact, the sole purpose of a declarative sentence is to give information. It always ends with a simple period. And if you’d like to see an example of a declarative sentence, you don’t need to look any further. Actually, every sentence in this paragraph is a declarative sentence.

You’ll find most of your writing contains declarative sentences, too. Practically all of your essays and reports can be made almost entirely of this sentence type. If the purpose of your work is to give information with statements of facts, or to state an idea, or to argue a point, declarative sentences will do the job. And let’s face it; that’s exactly what information seekers are looking for. Just remember declarative sentences aren’t designed to elicit a response with a command or question. They simply relay information.

Tip – If you ever have writer’s block, you can jumpstart your writing by simply typing a declarative sentence at the top of your document. For example, if your report is on marine life, you could get your thought processes going by typing: “Plankton is the most abundant food source in the ocean.” Then follow through with what, when, where, and how to flesh out your work.



When writing English sentences the writer may have a simple subject or a combination of subject and an object. To describe any actions or states of being the writer must use a verb or verbs to show who or what initiated, experienced or received the action or state of being.

The selection of verb and verb tense provides the writer with a wide variety of choices when expressing the relationships between the subjects, objects and external factors such as time. How many sentences can you write with these words?
For example:
A, an, the, it, it's, you, he, his, they, they've, that, their, we, people, all, also, another, after, any, but, most, never, in fact, if, although, some of, while, for the first time, from, of course, prepositions. Number, for example, Six people, one man.
Now answer this question:
How do you identify errors in a declarative sentence?
How do you answer a question?
How do you write an answer?
What should be first word of a declarative sentence?
What should be last word of a declarative sentence?
How should you end a declarative sentence?
What should be last sentence of an answer?
What is the best way to conclude an answer?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
What is a statement sentence?
How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
How do you identify if it is a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence? Are there specific words associated with a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
Are there specific characteristics of a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
What are some of the examples?
Does it state a fact or describe something and end with a period?
Does it start with a subject?
Does it give a command or request something and end with a period?
Does it ask a question?
Does it end in a question mark?
Does it start with a question word or a helping verb?
Discussion
How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
Is a declarative sentence an imperative sentence as well?
How does a declarative sentence end?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a pronoun?
How do you write a declarative sentence starting with a pronoun in different English language verb tenses? declarativesentencestartingwithapronoun.html

What makes a complete sentence?
What are five essential parts of a sentence?
The first word should start with a capital letter, subject, predicate, complete thought, and terminal punctuation: period, question mark or exclamation point.
Even if a sentence has the other four requirements, it still will not be a complete sentence without a capital letter at the very beginning.

Examples of Incomplete sentences:
missing subjects.
went to the store.
walked very quickly.
fell under the tree.

What are the types of sentences?
What is the difference between type and kind of sentences?
The types of sentences are: simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound complex sentences.

What are the kinds of sentences?
The kinds of sentences and what they do are:
A declarative sentence makes a statement.
An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.
An interrogative sentence asks a question.
An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling or emotion.

What constitutes a declarative sentence?
Sentences are regarded as declarative when the subject comes before the verb. �I am going downtown tomorrow� is a declarative sentence.

How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
A declarative sentence needs no special punctuation, nothing more than a period at the end of it.

What kind of sentence is it?
The building will be built on a hill.
It is a declarative sentence.

What kind of sentence is it?
Pass the rice bowl to me.
Try the vegetable curry.
It is an imperative sentence.
An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.

What kind of sentence asks a question?
An interrogative sentence asks a question.
Basic Rule.

The basic rule states that a singular subject takes a singular verb, while a plural subject takes a plural verb.

Rule 1. Two singular subjects connected by or or nor require a singular verb.
Example: My aunt or my uncle is arriving by train today.

Rule 2. Two singular subjects connected by either/or or neither/nor require a singular verb as in Rule 1.
Examples: Neither Juan nor Carmen is available.
Either Kiana or Casey is helping today with stage decorations.

Rule 3. When I is one of the two subjects connected by either/or or neither/nor, put it second and follow it with the singular verb am.
Example: Neither she nor I am going to the festival.

Rule 4. When a singular subject is connected by or or nor to a plural subject, put the plural subject last and use a plural verb.
Example: The serving bowl or the plates go on that shelf.

Rule 5. When a singular and plural subject are connected by either/or or neither/nor, put the plural subject last and use a plural verb.
Example: Neither Jenny nor the others are available.

Rule 6. As a general rule, use a plural verb with two or more subjects when they are connected by and.
Example: A car and a bike are my means of transportation.

Rule 7. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by words such as along with, as well as, besides, or not. Ignore these expressions when determining whether to use a singular or plural verb. Examples: The politician, along with the newsmen, is expected shortly.
Excitement, as well as nervousness, is the cause
of her shaking.

Rule 8. The pronouns each, everyone, every one, everybody, anyone, anybody, someone, and somebody are singular and require singular verbs. Do not be misled by what follows of.
Examples: Each of the girls sings well.
Every one of the cakes is gone.
NOTE: Everyone is one word when it means everybody. Every one is two words when the meaning is each one.

Rule 9.

With words that indicate portions—percent, fraction, part, majority, some, all, none, remainder, and so forth —look at the noun in your of phrase (object of the preposition) to determine whether to use a singular or plural verb. If the object of the preposition is singular, use a singular verb. If the object of the preposition is plural, use a plural verb.
Examples: Fifty percent of the pie has disappeared.
Pie is the object of the preposition of.
Fifty percent of the pies have disappeared.
Pies is the object of the preposition.

Rule 10. When either and neither are subjects, they always take singular verbs.
Examples: Neither of them is available to speak right now.
Either of us is capable of doing the job.

Rule 11. The words here and there have generally been labeled as adverbs even though they
indicate place. In sentences beginning with here or there, the subject follows the verb.
Examples: There are four hurdles to jump.
There is a high hurdle to jump.

Rule 12. Use a singular verb with sums of money or periods of time.
Examples: Ten dollars is a high price to pay.
Five years is the maximum sentence for that offense.

Rule 13. Sometimes the pronoun who, that, or which is the subject of a verb in the middle of the sentence. The pronouns who, that, and which become singular or plural according to the noun directly in front of them. So, if that noun is singular, use a singular verb. If it is plural, use a plural verb.
Examples: Salma is the scientist who writes/write the reports.
The word in front of who is scientist, which is singular. Therefore, use the singular verb writes. He is one of the men who does/do the work.
The word in front of who is men, which is plural. Therefore, use the plural verb do.

Rule 14. Collective nouns such as team and staff may be either singular or plural depending on their use in the sentence.
Examples: The staff is in a meeting.
Staff is acting as a unit here.
The staff are in disagreement about the findings.
The staff are acting as separate individuals in this example.
The sentence would read even better as:
The staff members are in disagreement about the findings.
What is an interrogative sentence?
An interrogative sentence is a sentence that asks a question.
For example: What color is the door?

What is a statement sentence?
A declarative sentence

How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
A declarative sentence needs no special punctuation, nothing more than a period at the end of it.

An interrogative sentence is one that asks a question, and is generally introduced by an interrogative pronoun: who, which, or what; or, by an auxiliary: do, am, have, shall, may, etc.

How does one write an interrogative sentence?
How does one write an imperative sentence?
How does one write an exclamatory sentence?
How does one write a compound complex sentence?
Why is it important to know whether a sentence is simple, compound, complex, or compound complex?

Can an interrogative pronoun like what or which be used as interrogative adjectives?
Yes.

What and which can be used either as interrogative pronouns or as interrogative adjectives followed by nouns.
e.g., What is that?

Can an interrogative pronoun like what or which be used as an interrogative adjective?
Yes.

What and which can be used either as interrogative pronouns or as interrogative adjectives followed by nouns.
e.g. What is that?
Which is his sister?
What time is it?
Which woman is his sister?
In the first two examples, what and which are used as interrogative pronouns. In the last two examples, what and which are used as interrogative adjectives preceding the nouns time and woman.

How do you identify if it is a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence? Are there specific words associated with a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?

Is tag questions and indirect question the same?
Is indirect question a declarative sentence or an interrogative sentence?

What should be the first word of a question?
Question word or helping verb. Except in tag question.

Are there specific characteristics of a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?

What should you be able to comment about an English sentence?
Is it a declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, or an imperative sentence?
Is it a simple, compound, complex, or compound complex sentence?
What is the pattern of the sentence?
Which is subject, verb, object, or complement?
What is the tense of the sentence?
Is it in newspaper format?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our? The second person you and your? The third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
In grammar, the form of a verb is determined by whether its subject is first, second, or third person and either singular or plural.

Can an interrogative pronoun like what or which be used as interrogative adjectives?
Yes.

What is a question mark used for?
Use a question mark to create an interrogative sentence, one that asks a question.

What is an auxiliary verb called if used with another auxiliary verb?

How many tenses can you make with each word?
Can you make twelve tenses from each word?
How do you write an interrogative sentence with the word though in it?
What are the rules for using which in an interrogative sentence?

How do you change an interrogative sentence to a declarative sentence?
Remove the question mark and change the word order so that it becomes a statement. Subject and verb change their position in statement and question.

How do you change a declarative sentence to an interrogative sentence?
Make it a question. Invert subject and verb:

The subject in a sentence is generally the person or thing carrying out an action. The object in a sentence is involved in an action but does not carry it out, the object comes after the verb.

For example:

The boy climbed a tree.

If you want to say more about the subject (the boy) or the object (the tree), you can add an adjective.

For example:

The young boy climbed a tall tree.

If you want to say more about how he climbed the tree you can use an adverb.

For example:

The young boy quickly climbed a tall tree.

The sentence becomes more interesting as it gives the reader or listener more information.

There are more things you can add to enrich your sentence.
Parts of a sentence Description
Adjective Describes things or people.
Adverb Alters the meaning of the verb slightly
Article a, an - indefinite articles
the - definite articles
Conjunction Joins words or sentences together
Interjection A short word showing emotion or feeling
Noun Names things
Preposition Relates one thing to another
Pronoun used instead of a noun to avoid repetition
Proper noun (subject) The actual names of people or places etc.
Verbs with 2 objects

If there are two objects in a sentence, the normal word order is:
person - thing

Examples:
I must give my sister a book.

person = my sister
thing = a book

I gave Mandy the letter.
person = Mandy
thing = the letter.

I gave her the letter.
person = her
thing = the letter

If the thing is a pronoun, it stands behind the verb.
I must give it to her.

person = to her.

thing = thing

thing = it

If we want to emphasize the person, we put the person after the thing. Then we use the preposition to.
person = person
Let's write the letter to John in California.

thing = the letter

person = to John in California.

Using the words describe, explain, report, say - we always put the person after the thing.
(preposition to)

person = person

I explain this rule to you.

person = to you
thing = this rule
Declarative
How do you write a declarative sentence?
What should be the verb tense of the declarative sentence?
Should it be written in past, present, or future tense?
Do you need to write a simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex declarative sentence?
What are examples of different English language tenses in a simple declarative sentence?
Do you know what verb tenses are?
Do you know what simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex declarative sentence are?
Do you know how every part of English speech or sentence is classified?
What constitutes a declarative sentence?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
How does one write a declarative sentence?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the second person you and your?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a noun in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a pronoun in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with an adjective in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with an adverb in English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a preposition in the English language?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a noun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a demonstrative pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with an object pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a possessive pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a reflexive pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence beginning with determiners with countable and uncountable nouns?

What are examples of a simple declarative (affirmative or negative) sentence with simple present, present progressive, present perfect, present perfect progressive, simple past, past progressive, past perfect, past perfect progressive, simple future, future progressive, future perfect, and future perfect progressive tense?

Can a simple declarative sentence beginning with a verb be written in the English language?
What should your response be while analyzing a declarative sentence?
It is a simple declarative sentence.
It is a compound declarative sentence.
It is a complex declarative sentence.
It is a compound complex declarative sentence.

Declarative sentences can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex sentences.
Questions can be multiple part questions.
Who are you and what do you need?
It is a multiple part question.

DECLARATIVE SENTENCE PATTERNS
1) Subject + Intransitive Verb
Lisa ran.
2) Subject + Transitive Verb + Direct Object
Lisa jumped an obstruction.
3) Subject + Linking Verb + Subject Complement
Lisa was happy.
4) Subject + Transitive Verb + Indirect Object + DirectObject
Lisa threw Alex the ball.
5) Subject + Transitive Verb + Direct Object + ObjectComplement

BASIC SENTENCE PATTERNS
DECLARATIVE SENTENCES
Declarative Sentences are groups of words which contain asubject and a verb, and make statements.

Some terms to know when dealing with Declarative Sentences:
Transitive Verbs: a verb which requires a direct object tocomplete its message.
Intransitive Verbs: a verb which does not require a directobject to complete its message.
Linking Verbs: a verb which relates a subject to itscomplement (typically, they are "to be" verbs such as is, was, are, were; verbs which related to thesenses of the human body, such as hear, see, smell; and, a few other words, such as become, appear,and seem).

Direct Object: is a word which receives the action of theverb or verbal Indirect Object: is a word which tells for or to whomsomething is done.

Object of the Preposition: is a word which follows apreposition. Subject Complement: follows a linking verb and describes thesubject. Object Complement: follows and modifiers or refers to adirect object.

Verb Complement: is a direct or indirect object of a verb(usually, a noun or pronoun).
Kinds of Sentences

Declarative
Interrogative
Exclamatory
Imperative

What should you be able to comment about an English sentence?
    1. Is it a declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, or an imperative sentence?
    2. Is it a simple, compound, complex, or compound complex sentence?
    3. What is the pattern of the sentence?
    4. Which is subject, verb, object, or complement?
    5. What is the tense of the sentence?
    6. Is it in newspaper format?
    7. Does the sentence need a preposition, object, or complement?
    8. Is the sentence in proper word order, including prepositions, objects, or complements?


You need to practice written and spoken English language every day.

English Grammar Rules of Writing Sentences

How did English grammar rules come into existence?
English grammar rules have evolved and are still evolving.
English grammar rules were not enacted by any executive order, royal decree, or global legislative enactment as of December 27, 2010. English language manuscripts circulate globally and via the Internet. You need to keep up to date with recent advances in the English language.
What are English grammar rules?
English grammar rules are different for interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences.
English grammar rules are different for simple, compound, complex, and compound complex sentences.
There are few English grammar rules similar to declarative and interrogative sentences.

What English language grammar rules should you elaborate on?

Are they applicable to interrogative sentences, simple, compound, complex, and compound complex declarative sentences, imperative sentences or exclamatory sentences?

To what type of English language sentence is this English language grammar rule applicable?

English language grammar rules are different for interrogative sentences, simple, compound, complex, and compound complex declarative sentences, and imperative sentences or exclamatory sentences.
Interrogative, declarative sentences can be written in various tenses.
Can imperative and exclamatory sentences be written in various tenses?
Declarative sentences
How do you use the personal pronoun I to write twelve tenses in simple declarative sentences?
How do you make a present perfect simple tense beginning with the pronoun I in a simple declarative sentence?
I have a question.
What is the tense of this sentence?
How do you make a present perfect simple tense having the pronoun I in a simple question?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the second person you and your?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a noun?
Nouns from Verbs
Where should an adjective be placed in s simple declarative sentence?
Can two or more adjectives be placed together in a simple declarative sentence?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with demonstrative adjectives?
You need to practice example sentences.
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with possessive adjectives?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences with possessive adjectives?
Where should a main verb be placed in s simple declarative sentence?
What are various functions of pronouns in a simple declarative sentence?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the second person you and your?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
Where should a pronoun be placed in s simple declarative sentence?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences in the English language beginning with a personal pronoun, demonstrative pronoun, possessive pronoun, interrogative pronoun, reflexive pronoun, reciprocal pronoun, indefinite pronoun, and relative pronouns?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our? The second person you and your? The third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
Where should an adverb be placed in s simple declarative sentence?
Where should a preposition be placed in s simple declarative sentence?
What are examples of a preposition in s simple declarative sentence?
Declarative
How do you write a declarative sentence?
What should be the verb tense of the declarative sentence?
Should it be written in past, present, or future tense?
Do you need to write a simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex declarative sentence?
What are examples of different English language tenses in a simple declarative sentence?
Do you know what verb tenses are?
Do you know what simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex declarative sentence are?
Do you know how every part of English speech or sentence is classified?
What constitutes a declarative sentence?
What are some examples of declarative sentences?
How does one write a declarative sentence?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the second person you and your?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a noun in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a pronoun in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with an adjective in the English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with an adverb in English language?
What are examples of simple declarative sentences beginning with a preposition in the English language?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a noun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a demonstrative pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with an object pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a possessive pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence with a reflexive pronoun?
What are examples of a simple declarative sentence beginning with determiners with countable and uncountable nouns?

What are examples of a simple declarative (affirmative or negative) sentence with simple present, present progressive, present perfect, present perfect progressive, simple past, past progressive, past perfect, past perfect progressive, simple future, future progressive, future perfect, and future perfect progressive tense?

Can a simple declarative sentence beginning with a verb be written in the English language?
What should be goals of your English language learning?
You should be able to write interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in the English language. Can you write interrogative, declarative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in English language?
What are examples of interrogative English language sentences?
What are examples of simple declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of compound declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of complex declarative English language sentences?
What are examples of compound complex English language sentences?
What are examples of English language imperative sentences?
What are examples of English language exclamatory sentences?
Word order in declarative statements
What is a statement sentence?
What is a complete sentence?
How do you add punctuation to a declarative sentence?
How do you write a declarative sentences using the first person I, me, my, we, our? The second person you and your? The third person he, she, it, they, their, his, hers, him, her?
What are some of the examples?
How do you identify if it is a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
Are there specific words associated with a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
Are there specific characteristics of a declarative, imperative, interrogative, or exclamatory sentence?
How many tenses can you make with each word?
Can you make twelve tenses from each word?
What should your response be while analyzing a declarative sentence?
It is a simple declarative sentence.
It is a compound declarative sentence.
It is a complex declarative sentence.
It is a compound complex declarative sentence.

Declarative sentences can be simple, compound, complex, or compound complex sentences.
English Language and Mathematics

How does the English language have mathematical answers?
Here are further guidelines.

Compound Declarative Sentences

What are examples of compound declarative English language sentences?

A compound declarative sentence helps vary sentence length within your writing, thereby making it more interesting to read. You can write a compound sentence in a variety of ways. Here are a few formulas to keep in mind.

1. A comma and conjunction joins the sentences.

The band played for hours, and the audience went wild.

John had to catch the next flight to Boston, so he packed as quickly as he could.

2. A semicolon joins the two sentences.

The band played for hours; the audience went wild.

Asif had to catch the next flight to Boston; he packed as quickly as he could.

3. A semicolon plus a transition word.

Transition words are actually conjunctions that are adverbs. Not sure about transition words? No problem. Examples of transition words are below:

However
In fact
Nonetheless
Besides
Instead
Moreover
Therefore
On the other hand
Nevertheless

And many more…

The house had a new roof and exterior paint; however the pipes were old.

Asif’s essay was phenomenal; in fact, it won the Young Author’s contest.

Jim worked hard everyday; therefore, he expected a raise at the end of the year.

As long as people want or need information, declarative sentences will be there to serve the purpose. When you think about it, it would extremely difficult to write anything at all without some type of declarative sentence.

Remember declarative sentences come in all forms: simple, compound and complex. They can make a point quickly or they can include direct objects, prepositions, indirect objects, and objects of prepositions. Whatever the structure, the purpose remains the same – to deliver a statement or fact.

The point is don’t let the sentence length confuse you. As long as it states something and doesn’t ask a question, make a command or an exclamation, it’s a declarative sentence.

You enhance your writing when you use a variety of sentence lengths and structures, which should always be your goal. Writing and reading, especially, should never be a boring task!

DECLARATIVE SENTENCES

Declarative Sentences are groups of words which contain a subject and a verb, and make statements.

Some terms to know when dealing with Declarative Sentences:

Transitive Verbs: a verb which requires a direct object to complete its message.

Intransitive Verbs: a verb which does not require a direct object to complete its message.

Linking Verbs: a verb which relates a subject to its complement (typically, they are "to be" verbs such as is, was, are, were; verbs which related to the senses of the human body, such as hear, see, smell; and, a few other words, such as become, appear, and seem).

Direct Object: is a word which receives the action of the verb or verbal

Indirect Object: is a word which tells for or to whom something is done.

Object of the Preposition: is a word which follows a preposition.

Subject Complement: follows a linking verb and describes the subject.

Object Complement: follows and modifiers or refers to a direct ob ject.

Verb Complement: is a direct or indirect object of a verb (usually, a noun or pronoun).

DECLARATIVE SENTENCE PATTERNS

1) Subject + Intransitive Verb

Lisa ran.

2) Subject + Transitive Verb + Direct Object

Lisa jumped an obstruction.

3) Subject+ Linking Verb + Subject Complement

Lisa was happy.

4) Subject + Transitive Verb + Indirect Object + Direct Object

Lisa threw Alex the ball.

5) Subject + Transitive Verb + Direct Object + Object Complement

Lisa jumped an obstruction the hurtle .

6) Subje ct + Intransitive Verb + Object of the Preposition (Prepositional Phrase)

Lisa ran around the neighborhood.

IMPERATIVE SENTENCES

Imperative Sentences are groups of words which do not necessarily contain a physical subject and which give commands.

1) Verb + Direct Object

Push the lever.

2) Verb + Object of the Preposition

Run around the neighborhood.

INTERROGATIVE SENTENCES

Interrogative Sentences are single words or groups of words which ask questions.

They may have not have subjects or even verbs.

They may even be fragments.
EX:
Hungry?

Are you hungry?

EXCLAMATORY SENTENCES

Exclamatory Sentences are single words or groups of words which show strong emotions or exclamations. Note: They may be combined with other types of sentences; however, if th ey show strong emotion then they remain exclamatory sentences.
EX:
Hurry!

Hurry, ________ your new furniture!
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Last Updated: April 9, 2017