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Navy
Naval aviation around the world.
Global royal navy
Harbour cranes
Maritime Shipping Routes and Strategic Passages
Museum ship
Naval aviation around the world.
Oil tanker sizes range from general purpose to ultra-large crude carriers on AFRA scale
Planet Earth Details
Port equipment
Shipbuilding
Size comparison between five of the longest ships of their type
Navy Carrier Aircraft
Ships
Warships
Shipyards
Shipbuilding
Submarine
Ship Type: Crude oil tanker
Worldwide Chokepoints
50 key facts about seas and oceans

Global royal navy
Who is who around the world in the global royal navy?
If you need to enlist, forward your profile and ship specifications with armaments.

The navies of the world military: What do you have to do?
Asia goes along with the world military
Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka, and Kerala in Asia go ahead with world military inspections.

Criminals operate from these locations. Seize and search operations.
Navy ships and other resources will launch from the Western coasts of these regions.
New residents from other regions of world settle in these locations.
Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka, and Kerala in Asia

What resources do you need?

Navy warships

USS Freedom
USS Independence
USS Nimitz
USS Normandy
USS Theodore Roosevelt, CVNT1
USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier
LCS ships
Global Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer

Helicopter
Helicopters for military naval missions


Fire scot Navy
Comanche Helicopter (Locas bomb)
Seahawk helicopter

Air Force

Fighter Jets
B2 Bomber
F22 Raptor
F35A
Harrier
Navy F35C
First the fighter jets launch.
After that, helicopters launch.
Ground forces
MH-60R Seahawk Multimission Naval Helicopter
MQ-8 Fire Scout

HMS Daring is the first Type 45 destroyer built at the Clyde shipyards.

1 Flight deck to take Lynx or Merlin combat helicopter
2 Navigation radar
3 Long-range radar monitors air and surface threats
4 Communications mast
5 Small-calibre gun
6 Multi-function radar can guide ship's missiles and detect enemy ones
7 Gunfire control system
8 Vertical-launching system for short- and long-range missiles
9 Medium-calibre main gun
10 Bow sonar (under keel)
Upper Clyde Shipbuilders (UCS) was a Scottish shipbuilding consortium created in 1968 as a result of the amalgamation of five major shipbuilders of the River Clyde.
Type 45 destroyer
Aircraft Carrier


Here are further guidelines.
What is the whole process in a shipbuilding?
Can a ship really be unsinkable?
Ethernet for In-ship Communication

Program Title Navy Shipbuilding (Military)
Department Name Dept of Defense--Military
Agency/Bureau Name Procurement
Program Type(s)
Assessment Year ______
Assessment Rating Adequate
Assessment Section Scores
Section Score
Program Purpose & Design
Strategic Planning
Program Management
Program Results/Accountability
Program Funding Level
(in billions)
FY2008 ______
FY2009 ______


* Ongoing Program Improvement Plans
* Completed Program Improvement Plans
* Program Performance Measures
* Questions/Answers (Detailed Assessment)

Ongoing Program Improvement Plans

Year Began Improvement Plan Status Comments

2008

Evaluate the specific requirements for shipbuilding capabilities in order to support the 2008

Quadrennial Defense Report goals and Secretary of Defense Priorities. Action taken, but not completed Navy Shipbuilding requirements will be evaluated and addressed through the DoD's management of capability portfolios. This capability portfolio management process will enable senior leaders to consider strategic trades across previously "stove piped" areas, and to better understand the implications of investment decisions across competing areas. Balancing capabilities within a portfolio will provide the most effective mix to deliver desired effects and meet objectives.

Completed Program Improvement Plans

Year Began Improvement Plan Status Comments

2008
To be updated
Work to ensure that shipbuilding decisions are made with long term fleet size and capability goals in mind.

Program Performance Measures
Term Type
Annual Outcome
Explanation:
Year Target Actual
2002 <10% 24%
2003 <10% 2%
2004 <10% 4.7%
2005 <10% 5.1%
2006 <10% 5.5%
2007 <10% Jan 08
2008 <10%
2009 <10%
Annual Efficiency
Measure:

Is the program purpose clear?
Explanation: The Shipbuilding Program is required to maintain a Navy of a specific fleet size. This program expressly addresses building ships for the Navy.

Does the program address a specific interest, problem or need?
Is the program designed to have a significant impact in addressing the interest, problem or need?
Is the program designed to make a unique contribution in addressing the interest, problem or need (i.e., not needlessly redundant of any other Federal, state, local efforts)?
Is the program optimally designed to address the interest, problem or need?
Does the program have a limited number of specific, ambitious long-term performance goals that focus on outcomes and meaningfully reflect the purpose of the program?
Does the program have a limited number of annual performance goals that demonstrate progress toward achieving the long-term goals?
Do all partners (grantees, sub-grantees, contractors, etc.) support program planning efforts by committing to the annual and/or long-term goals of the program?
Does the program collaborate and coordinate effectively with related programs that share similar goals and objectives?
Are independent and quality evaluations of sufficient scope conducted on a regular basis or as needed to fill gaps in performance information to support program improvements and evaluate effectiveness?
Is the program budget aligned with the program goals in such a way that the impact of funding, policy, and legislative changes on performance is readily known?
Has the program taken meaningful steps to address its strategic planning deficiencies?
Are acquisition program plans adjusted in response to performance data and changing conditions?
Does the agency regularly collect timely and credible performance information, including information from key program partners, and use it to manage the program and improve performance?
Does the program use strong financial management practices?
Has the program taken meaningful steps to address its management deficiencies?
Does the program define the required quality, capability, and performance objectives for deliverables?
Has the program demonstrated adequate progress in achieving its long-term outcome goal(s)?
Does the program achieve its annual performance goals?
Do independent and quality evaluations of this program indicate that the program is effective and achieving results?
DoD-Department of Defense-For perusal, approval.
Program Title
Navy Shipbuilding (Military/Merchant)
Q) What is the whole process in a shipbuilding?
Q) Can a ship really be unsinkable?
Q) Is the program purpose clear?
Q) What will it look like?
Q) Does the program address a specific interest, problem or need?
Q) Is the program designed to have a significant impact in addressing the interest, problem or need?
Q) Is the program optimally designed to address the interest, problem or need?
Q) Does the program have a limited number of specific, ambitious long-term performance goals that focus on outcomes and meaningfully reflect the purpose of the program?
Q) Does the program have a limited number of annual performance goals that demonstrate progress toward achieving the long-term goals?
Q) Do all partners (grantees, sub-grantees, contractors, etc.) support program planning efforts by committing to the annual and/or long-term goals of the program?
Q) Does the program collaborate and coordinate effectively with related programs that share similar goals and objectives?
Q) Are independent and quality evaluations of sufficient scope conducted on a regular basis or as needed to fill gaps in performance information to support program improvements and evaluate effectiveness?
Q) Is the program budget aligned with the program goals in such a way that the impact of funding, policy, and legislative changes on performance is readily known?
Has the program taken meaningful steps to address its strategic planning deficiencies?
Q) Are acquisition program plans adjusted in response to performance data and changing conditions?
Q) Does the agency regularly collect timely and credible performance information, including information from key program partners, and use it to manage the program and improve performance?
Q) Has the program taken meaningful steps to address its management deficiencies?

Museum ship
Fate: Museum Ship
Hornet is currently moored and functioning as a museum ship in Alameda, California.
USS Midway (CV-41)


Worldwide Chokepoints
Maritime Shipping Routes and Strategic Passages
Strait of Hormuz
The Suez Canal
The Panama Canal
The Strait of Malacca
The Strait of Hormuz
The Strait of Bab el-Mandab
The Strait of Gibraltar
The Strait of Bosporus
The Strait of Magellan.
The Cape Good Hope.
Here are further guidelines.

Primary passages

Suez Canal
Strait of Gibraltar
Panama Canal
Strait of Hormuz
Strait of Malacca

Secondary passages

Magellan Passage
Dover Strait
Sunda Strait
Taiwan Strait

Worldwide Chokepoints

Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean Sea with the Panama Canal
North Sea-Baltic Sea with several channels and straits
Mediterranean-Black Sea with the Strait of Gibraltar and access to Middle Eastern areas
Suez Canal, Bab el Mandeb, the Strait of Hormuz, and around South Africa to the Mozambique Channel
Southeast Asian Seas with the Malacca and Lombok Straits among others, and SLOCs passing the Spratly Islands
Northeast Asian Seas with SLOCs
Southwest Pacific with important SLOC access to Australia
Arctic Ocean with the Bering Strait

2010

2013

The Strait of Hormuz is the world's primary oil chokepoint.
Strait of Hormuz - 17 million barrels of oil per day
Strait of Malacca - 15.2 million barrels of oil per day
Cape of Good Hope - 4.9 million barrels of oil per day
Bab el-Mandab - 3.8 million barrels of oil per day
Danish Straits - 3.3 million barrels of oil per day
Suez Canal - 3.2 million barrels of oil per day
Bosporus - 2.9 million barrels of oil per day
Panama Canal - 0.85 million barrels of oil per day

Oil tanker sizes range from general purpose to ultra-large crude carriers on AFRA scale

Size comparison between five of the longest ships of their type

50 key facts about seas and oceans
2004
1. Oil tankers transport 60 percent (approximately 2,000 million tons) of oil consumed in the world.
2. More than 90 percent of the planet’s living biomass is found in the oceans.
3. Eighty percent of all pollution in seas and oceans comes from land-based activities.
4. Forty percent of the world’s population lives within 60 km of a coast.
5. Three-quarters of the world’s mega cities are by the sea.
6. By 2010, 80 percent of people will live within 100 km of the coast.
7. Death and disease caused by polluted coastal waters cost the global economy ______ a year.
The annual economic impact of hepatitis from tainted seafood alone is _______.
8. Plastic waste kills up to one million sea birds, 100,000 sea mammals and countless fish each year.
9. Sea creatures killed by plastic decompose, the plastic does not. Plastic remains in the ecosystem to kill again and again.
10. Harmful algal blooms, caused by an excess of nutrients -- mainly nitrogen from agricultural fertilizers -- have created nearly 150 coastal deoxygenated “dead zones” worldwide, ranging from 1 to 70,000 sq km.
11. An estimated 21 million barrels of oil run into the oceans each year from street runoff, effluent from factories, and from ships flushing their tanks.
12. Over the past decade, an average of 600,000 barrels of oil a year have been accidentally spilled from ships, the equivalent of 12 disasters the size of the sinking of the oil tanker Prestige in 2002.
13. Oceans cover 70 percent of the Earth’s surface.
14. More than 90 percent of goods ______ between _____regions are transported by sea.
15. Each year 10 billion tons of ballast water is transferred around the globe and released into foreign waters.
16. Ballast water often contains species -- such as the zebra mussel and comb jellyfish -- that can colonize their new environment to the detriment of native species and local economies.
17. Pollution, exotic species and alteration of coastal habitats are a growing threat to important marine ecosystems, such as mangroves, seagrass beds and coral reefs.
18. Tropical coral reefs border the shores of 109 ____regions, the majority of which are among the world’s least developed. Significant reef degradation has occurred in 93 regions_____.
19. Although coral reefs comprise less than 0.5 percent of the ocean floor, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of marine species are directly or indirectly dependent on them.
20. There are about 4,000 coral reef fish species worldwide, accounting for approximately a quarter of all marine fish species. 21. The Great Barrier Reef, measuring 2,000 km in length, is the largest living structure on Earth. It can be seen from the Moon.
22. Reefs protect human populations along coastlines from wave and storm damage by serving as buffers between oceans and near-shore communities.
23. Nearly 60 percent of the world’s remaining reefs are at significant risk of being lost in the next three decades.
24. The major causes of coral reef decline are coastal development, sedimentation, destructive fishing practices, pollution, tourism and global warming.
25. Climate change threatens to destroy the majority of the world’s coral reefs, as well as wreak havoc on the fragile economies of Small Island Developing States.
26. Average sea level has risen between 10 cm and 25 cm in the past 100 years. If all the world’s ice melted, the oceans would rise by 66 meters.
27. Sixty percent of the Pacific shoreline and 35 percent of the Atlantic shoreline are receding at a rate of one meter a year.
28. The phenomenon of coral bleaching is a major threat to coral health. In 1998 some 75 percent of the world’s reefs were affected by coral bleaching. Sixteen percent died.
29. The Plan of Implementation adopted at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) calls for a global marine assessment by 2004 and the development of a global network of marine protected areas by 2012.
30. Less than one half of a percent of marine habitats are protected -- compared with 11.5 percent of global land area.
31. The High Seas -- areas of the ocean beyond national jurisdiction -- cover almost 50 percent of the Earth’s surface. They are the least protected part of the world.
32. Although there are some treaties that protect ocean-going species such as whales, as well as some fisheries agreements, there are no protected areas in the High Seas.
33. Studies show that protecting critical marine habitats -- such as warm- and cold-water coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangroves -- can dramatically increase fish size and quantity, benefiting both artisanal and commercial fisheries.
34. Ninety percent of the world’s fishermen and women operate at the small-scale local level, accounting for over half the global fish catch.
35. Ninety-five percent of world fish catch (80 million tons) is from near-shore waters.
36. More than 3.5 billion people depend on the ocean for their primary source of food. In 20 years, this number could double to seven billion.
37. Artisanal fishing communities, which harvest half the world’s fish catch, are seeing their livelihoods increasingly threatened by illegal, unregulated or subsidized commercial fleets.
38. More than 70 percent of the world’s marine fisheries are now fished up to or beyond their sustainable limit.
39. Populations of commercially attractive large fish, such as tuna, cod, swordfish and marlin, have declined by as much as 90 percent in the past century.
40. Governments at _______, to maintain or restore depleted fish stocks to levels that can produce the maximum sustainable yield.
41. The WSSD Plan of Implementation calls for the elimination of destructive fishing practices and subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.
42. Government _______ fishing industry worldwide, promoting excess fishing capacity and encouraging over-fishing.
43. Destructive fishing practices are killing hundreds of thousands of marine species each year and helping to destroy important undersea habitats.
44. Each year, illegal longline fishing, which involves lines up to 80 miles long, with thousands of baited hooks, kills over 300,000 seabirds, including 100,000 albatrosses.
45. As many as 100 million sharks are killed each year for their meat and fins, which are used for shark-fin soup. Hunters typically catch the sharks, defin them while alive and throw them back into the ocean where they either drown or bleed to death.
46. Global by-catch -- unintended destruction caused by the use of non-selective fishing gear, such as trawl nets, longlines and gillnets -- amounts to 20 million tons a year.
47. The annual global by-catch mortality of small whales, dolphins and porpoises alone is estimated to be more than 300,000 individuals.
48. Fishing for wild shrimp represents 2 percent of global seafood but one-third of total by-catch. The ratio of by-catch from shrimp fishing ranges from 5:1 in temperate zones to 10:1 and more in the tropics.
49. Shrimp farming, too, is highly destructive. It causes chemical and fertilizer pollution of water and has been largely responsible for the destruction of nearly a quarter of the world’s mangroves.
50. Mangroves provide nurseries for 85 percent of commercial fish species in the tropics.

Strait of Hormuz

Types of Tankers
Different types of tankers
Oil Transportation

Planet Earth Details
Surface Area of the Planet (510,066,000 sq km)
Land Area on the Planet (148,647,000 sq km) 29.1%
Ocean Area (335,258,000 sq km)
Total Water Area (361,419,000 sq km) 70.9%
Type of Water (97% salt), (3% fresh)

To convert sq km (kilometers) to sq miles, multiply kilometers by: 0.386102; additional measurement multipliers
Last Updated: March 9, 2017